D.NY Commitments

BLACK LIVES MATTER
The struggle for racial equality continues and, in June of 2020, we addressed the call for transparency by publishing D.NY’s diversity representation. We also outlined several initiatives we put in place to address racism, inequality, discrimination and microaggressions within our company, and beyond. We bucketed our areas of change and focus into three categories: Company, Community, and Culture.

CHANGE THE COMMUNITY.
Here’s how we’re dedicating time and resources to create the next generation of diverse talent:
  1. Fund the Change School of Visual Arts Scholarship D.NY created the Fund the Change scholarship to help Black students break into advertising. Our first two recipients from SVA’s Class of 2025 will be awarded in March 2021. The Scholarship includes:
    • Two incoming freshmen students, who will each receive a $10,000 per year renewable merit scholarship, totaling $80,000 for the two students over the course of four years.
    • Guaranteed paid summer internships
    • Year-round mentoring for students to establish a network of connections, support opportunities, and continual feedback to help them get that first job, that next assignment, promotion or account.
  2. AEF CEO Val DiFebo has been a Board member since 2017 and D.NY has been actively involved with the ANA’s educational organization as well as their MADE Internship program for over two decades. In 2020, we gifted an AEF membership to Moore College of Art & Design and our CTO Husani Oakley was recognized as an AEF Talent Champion. D.NY talent from all departments continue to actively participate in virtual student programming.
  3. COOP Through hosting panel discussions and open houses, we’ve nurtured a strong relationship with COOP, an organization that aims to close the social capital gap by recruiting and investing deeply in diverse, low-income, and first-generation grads from the City University of New York and other urban public colleges.
  4. Funding Causes/Charities An annual December D.NY tradition is for employees to select their favorite causes and charities for the company to donate to; in 2020, Black Lives Matter and other diversity-focused charities topped our giving list.
  5. 600 & Rising. With D.NY CTO Husani Oakley as one of the founding members, we’ve pledged to #CommitToChange.
  6. Paid Holidays. We have made Juneteenth and Election Day paid holidays. In 2021 we’ll be using our relevant skills to supercharge local Election Day activities.

CHANGE THE COMPANY.
Here’s how we’re dismantling and reconstructing internal systems to ensure representation of Black and POC:
  1. In For 13 . This past June, D.NY committed to raising the percentage of Black bodies in leadership positions to 13% by 2023.
    • IMPACT: Today we stand at 14.3% representation, versus 7.7% in June 2020. It won’t stop here.
  2. Diversity Panel. Making Black voices a more representative part of the creative process, point #11 from 600 & Rising’s open letter to the industry, led to the creation of Deutsch’s Diversity Panel. Our Panel reviews work in development at various stages, from strategic positioning to final output, to ensure accurate, truthful and respectful representation of Black, POC, and LGBTQ+communities.
    • IMPACT: Behind the scenes, our Panel has influenced marketing and branding initiatives from our largest to our smallest clients. It affects all verticals: design of work, content, media placement, and the team behind it.
  3. Inclusive Recruiting. To guarantee systematic change, we are implementing a new ATS to improve effectiveness of hiring BIPOC talent, while mandating training for employees on how to hire inclusively.
    • IMPACT: Driving awareness of implicit bias and best practices.

CHANGE THE CULTURE.
Here’s how we are educating our employees and promoting the well-being, sensitivity and support for the BIPOC community:
  1. Speaker Education Series. We’re strengthening our resources internally by bringing in experts on microaggressions, diversity, equity and inclusion. In 2020, we hosted the “Subtle Acts of Exclusion Workshop” with Dr. Michael Baran and a Forum for Education of White Allies with speaker Miles Johnson.
  2. Open Conversations. We’ve hosted 10 Open Conversations since June, 2020 which have been the building blocks for creating an intimate, but open, environment to discuss important sensitive issues around diversity and inclusion. Programming topics have included:
    • Black representation in the media: Vogue’s July and August covers featuring Simone Biles and Viola Davis.
    • White Fragility guided book discussion.
    • Graciela Mohamed’s “How to be an Ally, not a Savior” TED Talk.
    • The Meaning, and Removal of, the Statue of Emancipation Memorial.
  3. Resources: By Deutschers, for Deutschers, we’ve created internal decks and educational tools for employees to continue their learning journey. Past decks include BLM Resources Deck Part 1 & 2 and a Voter Information Guide.

We’ll be revising and expanding our efforts as we move forward. This is not about speed, but about having a strategically sound action plan, executing that plan with intention, and holding our leadership team accountable at all times.

D.NY Representation

We are following the EEOC Federal reporting guidelines for both diversity and gender data. The EEOC limits gender to male and female, which doesn't reflect our belief that gender is non-binary.

In 2020, D.NY Black representation in Executive/Senior levels expanded from 7.7% to 14.3%. Data details that 40.9% of new hires were POC, 18.2% were Black or African American. Of those, 63.6% were women—31.8% POC and 13.6% Black women.

Data is from December 2020.
Race
Senior
Management
Mid-Level
Management
Professionals
Total
Asian
US
ny
10.1%
0.0%
15.2%
9.5%
18.0%
12.9%
10.1%
Black or African American
US
ny
2.4%
14.3%
4.8%
5.4%
6.7%
9.3%
9.0%
Hispanic or Latino
US
ny
3.6%
0.0%
5.4%
5.4%
6.3%
15.1%
10.1%
Two or more races/ native hawaiian or other pacific islander/ american indian
US
ny
1.4%
0.0%
2.0%
1.4%
2.7%
4.7%
2.8%
White
US
ny
82.5%
85.7%
72.5%
78.4%
66.4%
58.1%
68.0%
Gender
Senior
Management
Mid-Level
Management
Professionals
Total
Female
50.0%
55.4%
53.5%
53.9%
Male
50.0%
44.6%
46.5%
46.1%